Tuesday, October 20, 2020

Peter Pearce

Junior Conservative writer

I am going into my second year at the University of Exeter studying a flexible combined honour in Geography and Politics. My interest in politics and geography stems from an interest in current events and the wider world, with geography being the study of all world processes. As a discipline, geography is founded in political thought and ideologies which makes it a well suited to be studied alongside politics. At this point I would like to say Geography is a greatly under appreciated subject and consists of much more than simply colouring maps (most the time anyways).

I come from a small rural village in the middle of Lincolnshire (the East Midlands farming county south of Yorkshire for those of you who did not do GCSE geography). My interest in politics is hereditary, as both my parents have had real world experiences of significant events. My Mother’s family migrated from Ireland during The Troubles to a Lincolnshire council estate and my Father grew up in a London council estate during the 1950s in post-war Britain. As a result, I have grown up sensitive to the goings-on of the wider world and the causes behind them. When it comes to voting in UK elections, I vote Conservative, yet my own personal beliefs are sometimes ambivalent towards their policies.

I believe the anthropogenic impact on the environment is a major issue of our time and that its role in modern politics (in the UK and globally) is nowhere near as prominent as it should be. The distinction between nature and culture has blurred as humanity has extended its reach across the globe, leaving very few places untouched. The fact that there is not a single species of sea turtle that isn’t classified as endangered, to varying degrees, alone should be a wake up call to the impact in which we are having (recycle or buy reusable straws, or better yet drink from the cup itself).

On the perpetually topical issue of Brexit, I am a Leaver. I believe the EU simply keeps the wealthy nations affluent by centralising global wealth between a select few whilst also leaching away the sovereignty of its member countries. In a world of almost eight billion people, how can total inclusivity and equality be achieved through maintaining an inner circle of nations, which actively prohibits the establishment of a true global community. In other words, Brexit means Brexit.

Pronouns: he/him